About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 9
CNNW 6
CNN 3
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
. all of this is happening and secretary of state clinton has gone to egypt and the west bank helped broker a cease-fire deal. joining us now is michael oren who is is really ambassador to the united states it's great to have you with us today. >> good to be with you too, jenna. jenna: what information you have about the bombing? >> we don't know who is responsible yet, but we do know that hamas is celebrating. giving out candy to children, you can go on youtube and see that hamas supporters saying that they want more israeli body bags. it is about genocidal groups in gaza trying to kill the maximum number of israelis, while we are trying to defend ourselves and reduce the palestinian civilian casualties to the greatest extent that we can. the terrorists are digging in behind us million population. jenna: how has the cease fire talks been going? >> they have not been going well. they are discussing a long-term arrangement to put in a mechanism that prevent hamas from shooting at our population and paralyzing half the country. also stopping iran from smuggling long-range missiles into
but while preparing israeli troops are gathering on the border. even as egypt works to broker a deal, former british prime minister tony blair traveled to tel aviv to sit down with israeli president perez. >> i hope that over the coming days we can achieve cessation on a basis that is sustainable. >> and joining me now from gaza, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman. what's the latest on what's happening in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they wa
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. and his office put out a remarkable statement saying why israel was agreeing to it. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to hi
to tel aviv. those were iranian-made missiles, and a big part of the ceasefire was pressure put on egypt to stop the smuggling tunnels. the question is whether iran will continue to keep smuggling weapons in, that's most likely a yes. number three, will the egyptians stop it, and number three, will islamic jihad listen to hamas and stop the rocket fire or will they continue to cause problems here for israel. back to you. gregg: leland vittert, thanks very much. so will the ceasefire hold? what does this mean for hillary clinton and her shuttle diplomacy? general jack keane advised hillary clinton for many, many years, he will join us in just a couple of minutes. >> meanwhile, a trio of u.s. warships sent to the eastern mediterranean area just in case americans need to be evacuated out of israel. the ships were due to return to norfolk, virginia, but their homecoming will be a bit delayed by at least several days. reports say these ships would not play a combat role and would only be used to help americans in that area. they can also serve as floating hospitals if need be. >>> susan rice
the weapons to egypt and hold the egyptian government responsible for hamas abide big the truce. so it is not about what both sides don't want, because they both want to avoid war, but what they want to come out of this appearing victorious or at least gained within their own political frameworks, and this is what is difficult for the egyptian media to bring these two sides together. >> thank you, so much from gaza. be safe. >>> and now to the middle east where president obama is now in cambodia, the third and the final stop on a multiday and multicountry tour. the president arrived in cambodia at 5:00 a.m. eastern time, and becoming the first sitting u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobod
rockets in any other way. of course there is some diplomatic activity going on, too, in egypt in particular, trying to organize a truce. only a 48-hour truce between israel and hamas. so there's a positive moves ahead going on trying to end this diplomatically. but not everybody is betting on that right now, alex. >> sounds like all the pieces are on the chess board for sure. thank you very much, martin fletcher. >> let's get some perspective on this crisis. joining me is military analyst general mccaffrey. is there a danger this could turn into a larger middle east war? >> no question. i think we're one step shorter of an all out ground operation in the gaza. i don't see how the israelis could top rate continued threat to huge parts of the civilian population. and then in the background, of course, we have the iranians and hezbollah on the lebanese southern border. the israelis are quite vulnerable to these rocket strikes. fit went to all-out war there would be significant israeli losses. >> all right, general, would the u.s. get involved militarily if this does escalate? >>
from gaza into the state this year alone and there is collateral damage. egypt's new government is denouncing israel's actions and causing renewed tension between the two countries. that treaty on which so much rests upon. "outfront" tonight, former chief of staff to benjamin netanyahu and senior fellow of middle eastern studies -- let me start with you and where you're standing tonight, egypt and jordan both condemning israel. your two allies in the region. they're saying your prime minister netanyahu has overplayed his hand and probably is undermining his security. what do you say to that? >> there's a wrong side and a right side. the wrong side is the side that shoots thousands of missiles on civilians. what israel is doing now is the right thing. weaver defending ourselves. that's the right thing to do. >> is neftali right? there's a wrong side and a right side? >> it's not as simple as that. it's not as black and white as that, unfortunately. on the other side, there are also people who are dying. 20 people have died today. dozens more injured and i suspect overnight, we wi
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
with iran. it's been testing the new middle east, testing egypt's stance, forming new relations. seeing how volatile the arab world is. it's been testing hezbollah. and president obama immediately threw his lot in with israel. the president didn't say we want to call for cessation of hostile tis. he immediately said we agree with israel's right to defend itself. israel's real enemy is iran. they were at the u.n. holding up his bomb chart. he was talking about iran. that is israel's overriding threat. they have been able to deal with them handedly. i have seen yesterday israeli warships able to take out a single hamas militant who was sitting in a chair by the water front. so one warship fired a rocket. you could barely ship on the horizon. israel has been telephoning the houses of neighbors of militants and telling them to get out. it has their phone numbers. so there's something suspicious. israel has too much intelligence. they have been able to deal with them too confidently. you have to wonder is there really a different objective. >> could it be better for israel to get rid of the miss
of negotiations by the newly elected president of egypt and u.s. diplomats. the u.n. ambassador says now it it's time for the two sides to speak directly. >> this crisis was yet another reminder that the absence of peace always risks the presence of war. the united states remains firmly and fully committed to the only viable solution to the tragic israeli/palestinian conflict. two states for two peoples, reached through direct negotiations. >> there is a possibility. >> the israeli president says he agreed to the truce after being urged to do so by president obama. >>> hamas leaders sounded anything but conciliatory. they trumpeted the truce as a victory saying israel is inevitably destined for defeat. residents living in gaza echoed that theme saying it has refused to raise the white flag to israel. >>> we have good news to report with the cease-fire. we want to go to jerusalem. on the phone is abc's lama hasan. >> lama, thank you for joining us this morning. what can you tell us? >> good morning to you guys. well i think it is safe to say this is a region that remains on edge. to see if both
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)